Wednesday, May 27, 2020

How To Write A Persuasive Essay Tips And Topics

Persuasive Essay: a Comprehensive Guide Help Source A persuasive essay is one of the most common assignments regardless of the academic level. The paper gives you a perfect opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of the subject, vocabulary skills, critical thinking, and so much more. Persuasive speech can easily be considered as an art form or a skill you’ll have to use throughout your education and beyond. In order to write an outstanding paper, you just need the right approach and practical tools. Scroll down to find out more. [short_code_type_1] Definition A persuasive essay is defined as a type of an essay wherein a writer explains a topic and attempts to persuade a reader that his/her point of view is most informed, accurate, and valid perspective on the subject. Throughout the paper, a writer develops an argument, takes sides, and explains why a reader should adopt their opinion. Persuasive writing utilizes logic and reason to demonstrate that one idea is more legitimate and superior than the other. Although the goal is to persuade a reader, a writer should not make baseless claims. Instead, the argument must always use sound reasoning and solid evidence. [short_code_type_2] How to write a Persuasive Essay? At the very beginning, you should take a few moments to think about the essay topic. Do you agree with it? Do you disagree? Form your opinion on a given subject. Teachers and professors want to get a closer insight into your critical thinking, so try to avoid thinking whether your professor would agree/disagree with it too. Use your own opinion to develop an argument, research, and compose a persuasive essay. Persuasive essays often push the envelope and discuss controversial subjects. You don’t have to play it safe. It all comes down to the way you portray your argument and evidence you choose to persuade a reader to adopt some opinion. [short_code_type_3] How to Start a Persuasive Essay? Persuasive speech requires a thorough preparation. Before the writing process can begin, you need to research the subject. In fact, research is the basis or foundation where you’ll build the essay. Why? That is the process when you get informed about the subject even though you probably think you know everything. Research yields evidence that a writer can use to back up all the claims. Once the research process is over, it’s time to proceed to the outline. Without an outline, your mind is scattered, wanders from one idea to another and it shows in your writing style. Composing an outline allows you to organize the notes you’ve taken while researching, and it always generates a few additional ideas you can use. Persuasive Essay Outline Outline – the outline for persuasive essay consists of three major parts: introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Each of these parts can be divided into subsections that keep you focused on your argument without risking wandering off the topic Intro – the main purpose of the introduction is to catch reader’s attention and make them interested enough to continue reading. Ideally, the introduction should consist of three elements: the hook, defining the audience, and thesis statement. The hook is the very first sentence of your essay and its goal is to get someone’s attention. Your hook can be anything from a question to fun facts, quotes, and anecdotes. Right after hook, you have to make the introduction relatable to the audience. A reader (or more of them) has to feel close to the subject. Why should they bother reading? Specify why the subject is important to them. The last sentence or two of the introduction accounts for the thesis statement. This is the part where you clearly state the subject you’re going to discuss and the argument you’ll make Body Paragraphs – a specific number of paragraphs in this section isn’t defined. It all comes down to your argument and claims you make. Each paragraph in the body section should consist of a claim that supports the argument and evidence. One claim, one paragraph. Depending on the subject and word count, you can also address opposing views to show why they are wrong (with evidence, of course) Conclusion – the last paragraph of the persuasive essay and equally important as other sections. The conclusion should consist of a short summary of the topic, benefits to the reader, and call-to-action. A short summary of the topic mentions key points you’ve made. The next sentence or two specifies why it’s important to take an action, potential solutions, and what could happen if nothing is done on the matter. To motivate a reader, finish off the essay with a simple call-to-action line or sentence.

Saturday, May 16, 2020

A Complicated Matter Of Air Pollution - Free Essay Example

Sample details Pages: 2 Words: 553 Downloads: 1 Date added: 2019/04/15 Category Ecology Essay Level High school Tags: Air Pollution Essay Pollution Essay Did you like this example? Air Pollution One of the major cause of air pollution is the burning of fossil fuel. The wasteful and toxic release of substances can cause damage to the environment. The amount of harmful substance you inhale in your human body can cause numerous health problems, including a life-threatening illness. Pollution has affected the environment that causes serious health issue to human. Geographically, by a large amount of chemical mixture saturated in the atmosphere, other countries are experiencing acid rain and crop damages. Air pollution is one of the many current problems or challenges the world is faced with and is one of the precipitating factors responsible for the climatic change in the world we live in today. The scourge of ever-present air pollution is gradually becoming uncontrollable with the failure of local, global authorities and other major stakeholders to effectively address the catastrophic direction that it gravitates to, especially in commercial and industrial societies. Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "A Complicated Matter Of Air Pollution" essay for you Create order Air pollution is a complicated matter that cannot be overlooked or over-emphasized in any way, especially today. The air we breathe is becoming more unclean with the passing of each day as result of air pollution. We are quick to jump on the bandwagon to pontificate about the causes of air pollution and its adverse effects, but we have failed to realize that every one of us have had a fair share of a role, knowingly and unknowingly, to play in propelling air pollution epidemic proportions, and the situation that we find ourselves today. According to Roy Harrison, air pollutants may exist in a gaseous or particulate form. These substances are sulfur dioxide and ozone. A carbonaceous particle from diesel engine exhaust and sulfur dioxide from power stations are examples of primary pollutants. (Harrison 169). Overcoming the challenges of air pollution has been one of the major global environmental issues bedeviling the world today; this is because of its contribution to the large percentage of the global variation of climate, which has been a threat to many developed and developing societies today. Efforts should be intensified to adequately address the issue of air pollution globally through policies that are geared towards massive reduction of this epidemic. An all-encompassing approach that adequately addresses the reduction of greenhouse gases, Traffic emission, industrial emissions and other aforementioned causes of air pollution, backed with adequate funding should be put in place. The United Nations, World Environmental protection agencies and, other major stakeholders should champion the initiative of having a greener environment that is relatively low in the concentration of air pollutants, if not totally eradicated. Individuals should also be educated on the need to refrain from such activities that are responsible for pollution. Modern age Technologies that encourage the use of renewable energy, less of combustible energy, which in-turn promotes the actualization of a greener environment and the dream of this generation and future generations to breathe in clean air, should be accessible by the world populace. Industrial and manufacturing processes, with by or end products that are gaseous and aqueous matter that contributes massively to air pollution should be reviewed with the view of proffering a lasting solution to the menace of these dangerous emissions. Work Cited Pollution:Causes, Effects and Control, edited by R. M. Harrison, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2001. ProQuest Ebook Central, https://ezproxy.clayton.edu:2200/lib/claytonstate/detail.action?docID=1186016.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Progressive Movement Of The United States - 874 Words

The progressive movement was one of the greatest times in America’s history, not only was the progressive movement noble but also needed especially after the lasting effects of the Civil War. Although there were many problems still plaguing the United States the progressive movement provided some Americans with a sense of hope because of changes in politics. First of all, progressive Presidents like Teddy Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson would not necessarily fight for their own political parties, but would fight for the people, reduce the power of big businesses that exploited their employees and helped small businesses by introducing antitrust legislation. Women’s rights also became a huge issue during the progressive movement which would be solved by granting women more rights and even giving Americans the right to directly select senators. Basically the progressive movement was beneficial to America because it gave more Americans more opportunities, like being able to v ote, being able to make decent wages and small business to be able to compete. â€Å"There is hardly an office in any part of the country in which the business man has not been elected; yet politics remain corrupt† (Lincoln Steffens, 141). This is what journalist Lincoln Steffens had portrayed about politics in the United States, that businessmen ran the country and only cared about money and not the people. Although America has successful business practices, its ability for almost anyone to start their ownShow MoreRelatedThe Progressive Movement Of The United States982 Words   |  4 PagesThe Progressive Movement The rapid industrialization of United States in the late part of the 19th Century challenged the political, economic and judicial system in every possible way. The impeachment of President Andrew Johnson weakened the executive branch for many years until President Theodore Roosevelt came into power. A new progressive movement of positive government started emerging at both federal and state level. This government was ought to take a more proactive role to reform governmentRead MoreThe Progressive Movement in the United States Essay717 Words   |  3 PagesHerbert Croley viewed America as a movement of public opinion. which believed itself to be and called itself essentially progressive. Cooley explained that for a long time it was common for a man who participated in political life to be either a republican or democrat, but now the politician was being based on his relation to the progressive movement. He explained that political leaders, who have did well of their party but who have offended the progressives, are retiring or are being retired fromRead MoreUnited States Constitution and Progressive Movement775 Words   |  4 Pagesï » ¿What, in your opinion, were the key principles of the Progressive Movement? In your opinion, what were Progressivism’s most significant successes and failings? Can the First World War be regarded as a particularly Progressive conflict, or did it derail the Progressive Movement—or are both of these statements true? What, in your opinion, were the key principles of the Progressive Movement? Characteristics of the Progressive Era include refining of the government, rebuilding, a concentrationRead MoreThe Revolution Of The United States865 Words   |  4 Pagescalled the progressives demanded change and more government involvement after the gilded age where there barely was any action taken by the government. While the progressives were becoming more and more popular among politicians and people they brought reform and change to the United States. The progressives brought change through industries, social movements and the economy. The progressives, (as their name suggests) brought progress to America that forever changed the United States for the betterRead MoreEssay about The Progressive Era: Conflicting Viewpoints1651 Words   |  7 PagesThe Progressive Era: Conflicting Viewpoints Works Cited Missing Two people witnessing the same event can have very different views on it depending on their information and perspective. The presentation of history also changes depending on the resources and prior prejudices and personal views of the historian. Four historian’s interpretations on the Progressive Era and Progressivism were reviewed to determine whether their arguments and use of evidence were sound. Also, the particular knownRead More The Progressive Movement Essay531 Words   |  3 Pages The Progressive Movement quot;Progressive Education assumes the world changes, and that in a universe that is not particularly concerned with ability to think straightquot; - Rychard Fink During the early 1900s, the Progressive Movement came to the forefront of what Herbert Kliebard has called quot;the struggle for the American curriculum.quot; Progressivism consistently challenged traditional ideals concerning the foundations upon which students education in schools was based. The movementRead MoreThe Successes of Progressive Era Reformers800 Words   |  4 Pages The Successes of Progressive Era Reformers The Progressive movement was very influential in many ways to early twentieth century America. Businesses became safer, and much more respectful towards their employees. Society accepted moral changes, and became safer communities. The government was affected by the Progressive movement becoming much more democratic, and caring more for the needs of its people. The Progressive movement was successful in reforming American business, society and its governmentRead MoreThe Progressive Era Of American History1346 Words   |  6 PagesThe progressive era is one of the most researched times in American history due to the multiple social and economic movements that took place. When historians argue about progressivism, they are not just debating about events of a century ago, they are struggling to interpret the basic meaning of American democracy. The progressive era is a widely debated topic among many historians. It is known as a time period that consisted of economic, political, socia l, and moral reforms. In summary the progressiveRead MoreComparing the Approaches of the Progressive and Populist Movements893 Words   |  4 Pages20th century the progressive movement and populist movement were groups and organizations getting together to resolve social, economic, and political problems occurring in the United States. Both movements had different approaches to what was more important and how to deal with problems. Progressivism was mainly for the betterment of cities while populism is for agrarian section of farmers. First of all there were social failures and successes between the populist and the progressive. During the progressiveRead MoreLabor And The Roots Of Progressivism1539 Words   |  7 PagesAnwar Khalid Professor Wegner HIST 124 11 November, 2014 Labor and the Roots of Progressivism The progressive era was an age of rapid advancement in social, economic, and societal values that shaped the United States into what it is today. The industrialization and subsequent labor reforms of the mid to late nineteenth century across the world helped to shape the United States and its entry into the modern world. Labor unions and the reforms they forced helped us to modernize and ethically improve

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Guasha Review free essay sample

Wei Shuwei The movie Guashas setting is in America. It tells a story about the conflicts arisen by the culture differences between the Chinese an American. Xu Datong, a Chinese immigrant, had made a great success in the field of video game design. One day, Datongs little son, Denis had a stomachache. The grandfather, who just came to Join the family, used Guasha treatment to cure Denis stomachache. The treatment made Dennis back black and blue, which later became the evidence of child abuse. Datong ook all the responslbllltles for his father. Although he tried to explain that Guashd Is a traditional Chinese treatment but failed to persuade the Judge. He was forced to separate from his wite and son. However, the story had a happy ending. Datongs boss experienced Guasha and helped the family out of the trouble. At the beginning of the movie, Datong seemed to have realized his American dream, for he had a successful career, a lovely wife and an adorable child. We will write a custom essay sample on Guasha Review or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page He believed that America was a true land of opportunities and Immigrants could become the truly uccessful Americans by working hard. However, life is not always full of roses. The American dream broke overnight due to the Guasha treatment to his own child. We cant tell it Is the American or the Chinese that did the wrong things. The cultural differences and local laws shouldnt be Ignored by immigrants. The main line of the movie was the Guasha treatment. The children welfare organization accused Datong of abusing his child. Like other Chinese, Datong took It for granted that Guasha was just an ordinary medical treatment. However, the American didnt think so. He tried to detend himselt but tailed to win the lawsuit. As he didnt have an effective communication, he failed to persuade the American even his good friend that Guasha was a medical treatment. Later his good friend went to experience Cuashd and realized that what he said was true. When he was accused, he failed to learn in advance the American legal system and procedures and did something Irrational, which put him Into troubles again and again. Also the Chinese tace culture is shown in the movie, which cant be understood by the American. Datong beat Dennis on the head because he didnt want to say sorry to Paul, son of Datongs boss. His boss thought kids fight was not a big deal. Although he didnt think his son was wrong, he beat him In front of his boss to show his respect to his boss. His behavior later became the evidence that he was a violent father. Another difference is respecting and caring aged parents. Datongs boss couldnt unaerstana wny ne0 mace a scapegoat Tor nls Tatner. Datongs wlTe simply rellea because he is a Chinese. Datongs cultural beliefs were so deeply set that its mpossible for him think about the consequences of telling lies. Cultural differences are bound to be there due to the differences in perspective of philosophy, history, geography, mode of conduct etc. So do as Rome does while in Rome. Its necessary to have the intercultural awareness, tolerate and adapt to the cultural diversity. Effective communication could be a way to solve the cultural differences. After the communication the world would be more harmony in the future. I think thats why the hero named Datong in Chinese.

Thursday, April 16, 2020

The Leadership Moment Essays - Composition, Fiction,

The Leadership Moment The Leadership Moment is a collection of nine true stories of triumph and disaster and their lessons for us all. The stories are familiar: Eugene Kranz and Apollo 13; John Gutfreund and Salomon Brothers; Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the Civil War, to name a few. The stories are drawn from the past and present, represent a wide-range of challenges that include both natural and man-made disasters, and illustrate lessons of success and failure. The author, Michael Useem, is the director of the Wharton School's Center for Leadership and Change Management. He does a superb job of relating the events and definitive moments of each narrative. Events unfold with the right mix of facts and drama to keep the reader interested. Lessons, or implications as Useem calls them, are woven throughout the narratives. Charts and pictures supplement the text where appropriate. The nine stories are sandwiched by an introduction and conclusion. All the implications presented in the book, about 40, are summarized in a final chapter called A Leader's Guide. The book assumes that much can be learned about leadership by the successes and failures of others. The author's concluding chapter extracts nine leadership principles from the nine leadership moments: know yourself, explain yourself, expect much, gain commitment, build now, prepare yourself, move fast, find yourself, and remain steadfast. The Leadership Moment reads like an adventure novel. Even the book's cover, mountain climbers trudging up a foreboding slope, promotes a sense of intrigue and danger. Useem is a great storyteller. His selection of narratives provokes many thoughts about leadership triumphs and disasters. My only real frustrations with the book stem from the implications and the nine leadership principles. The 40 implications that Useem introduces across the nine chapters can overwhelm a reader. Even though he summarizes them in the Leadership Guide, I doubt most people will remember more than about five once they put the book away. Readers will more likely remember the nine short-and-simple principles. Unfortunately, their introduction at the end of the book gives the appearance that they are an afterthought. Useem should introduce them at the beginning and help the reader understand the context for selecting each narrative. The Leadership Moment is easy reading. I kept the book in my car and read it during the 10-15 minutes I often spend waiting to pick up my daughter at school or the bus stop. The short-story format is perfect for the person with lots of fragmented time. The Leadership Moment is a great addition to your reading list. Lynn Heinrichs is associate dean of the College of Business and associate professor of computer information systems. Her interests include data communications, networks, and information technology management Book Reports

Friday, March 13, 2020

Free Essays on Ad and Ego

The Ad and the Ego Students will never look at an ad the same way again after screening The Ad and the Ego, the first comprehensive examination of advertising and our culture of consumption. The film artfully intercuts clips from hundreds of familiar television ads with insights from Stuart Ewen, Jean Kilbourne, Richard Pollay, Sut Jhally, Bernard McGrane and other noted critics, performing a cultural psychoanalysis of late 20th century America and its principal inhabitants, Consumer Man and Woman. The Ad and the Ego depicts how the market economy has metastasized until today commercialism invades the most intimate aspects of our lives. The average American is exposed to 1500 ads a day. But, like the air we breathe, we pay advertising little attention preferring to believe we're impervious to it. Scholars point out that advertising's constant stream of messages forms the neural network of a consumer society integrating individual psychology, mass culture and commodity production. As the film progresses, we begin to perceive how ads for Nike, Calvin Klein, Oil of Olay, and Suzuki are selling more than products. As Jean Kilbourne argues, they sell us values, concepts of love and sexuality, romance and success, a sense of identity, above all, what is "normal." Leading media critics demonstrate how living in an advertisement infused environment creates a psychology of need, massaging our anxieties, doubts, and discontents, creating a boundless hunger for more things. One message you'll never hear in an ad, sociologist Bernard McGrane observes, is "You're OK." The Ad and the Ego traces advertising's development from its largely descriptive 19th century origins through today's ads which eschew rational arguments for symbols and imagery playing directly to our emotions. Sut Jhally describes ads as "the dream life of our culture" and explains the persuasive techniques they use to invest commodities with powerful prop... Free Essays on Ad and Ego Free Essays on Ad and Ego The Ad and the Ego Students will never look at an ad the same way again after screening The Ad and the Ego, the first comprehensive examination of advertising and our culture of consumption. The film artfully intercuts clips from hundreds of familiar television ads with insights from Stuart Ewen, Jean Kilbourne, Richard Pollay, Sut Jhally, Bernard McGrane and other noted critics, performing a cultural psychoanalysis of late 20th century America and its principal inhabitants, Consumer Man and Woman. The Ad and the Ego depicts how the market economy has metastasized until today commercialism invades the most intimate aspects of our lives. The average American is exposed to 1500 ads a day. But, like the air we breathe, we pay advertising little attention preferring to believe we're impervious to it. Scholars point out that advertising's constant stream of messages forms the neural network of a consumer society integrating individual psychology, mass culture and commodity production. As the film progresses, we begin to perceive how ads for Nike, Calvin Klein, Oil of Olay, and Suzuki are selling more than products. As Jean Kilbourne argues, they sell us values, concepts of love and sexuality, romance and success, a sense of identity, above all, what is "normal." Leading media critics demonstrate how living in an advertisement infused environment creates a psychology of need, massaging our anxieties, doubts, and discontents, creating a boundless hunger for more things. One message you'll never hear in an ad, sociologist Bernard McGrane observes, is "You're OK." The Ad and the Ego traces advertising's development from its largely descriptive 19th century origins through today's ads which eschew rational arguments for symbols and imagery playing directly to our emotions. Sut Jhally describes ads as "the dream life of our culture" and explains the persuasive techniques they use to invest commodities with powerful prop...

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Person-Job Fit and Person-Organization Fit Essay

Person-Job Fit and Person-Organization Fit - Essay Example The recruitment strategy considers the extent of fit between the person and the job as well as the fit between the person and the organization (Newell, 2005). The aspect of person-job fit and the person-organization fit are important to recruit the right person for the job and to improve the capability of the organization to reduce the attrition which is not good for the organization. Further, the recruitment strategy is extremely important from the organizational point of view. The organization recruits the candidates on the basis of their merit and their capabilities that fit the requirement of the organization and in this context, the person-job fit is extremely important for framing the recruitment strategy and the person-job fit explains that the various criteria that are listed and checked while interview and recruiting the candidates. Moreover, the person to be recruited should have the skills to perform the tasks required to be carried out for the business of the organization (Saks and Ashforth, 1997). The right match between the person and the nature of job ensures that the person is satisfied with the job that he is undertaking and the recruiting strategy of the organization is aimed at enabling the persons in taking pride of the job that is performing. Further, the employers Wal-Mart, Tesco, IBM, Vodafone, etc. are the biggest employers with their emplo yees recruited in markets all over the world. It is ensured that the persons recruited match the desired skills for the job and the multinational organizations spend enough money, resources, and infrastructure in training they're the workforce and help them improve their expertise (Edwards, 2012).